Social Connects

 

Feb
26
2014

ECC Perspectives on Salvation: Shalom, Justification, and Breathing Kingdom Air

For Covenanters, any study of salvation must begin with the Scriptures. We ask, “What does the Bible say?” (which is a version of the Covenant axiom “Where is it written?” that discourages proof-texting). This means that regardless of tradition, informed and skillful interpretation of Scripture will be the final arbiter of our soteriology. Covenanters also engage with the best scholarly thinking available to us, both past and present. Therefore, Covenanters gladly stand within the Reformation tradition of ‘justification by grace through faith,’ while also making space for contemporary perspectives on justification. We want to be Reformed, and always reforming! The Covenant’s perspective on salvation is colored not only by its historical roots in the Reformation, but also in the Pietist renewal movement which sought to further reform Protestantism and also to recover the living faith of the Early Church. So in the Covenant’s own history there is precedent for an on-going process of reformation toward greater and greater spiritual renewal.

The Scriptural Story: Salvation as Shalom-establishing

Beginning with Scripture, we find that salvation is rescue. In this sense, it implies the overcoming of danger, a conflict, or an enemy. But it is also the state of being free, whole, and safe from harm. For humanity, this state can only be achieved when we are joined with our Creator. Therefore, salvation is both being saved from something and saved to Someone. Scripture’s witness to salvation is displayed in the progressively-unfolding story of God’s action in the world in relationship to God’s creation, and to humanity in particular. The story which Scripture tells again and again is: 1) God forms a people; 2) God provides that people with a home; 3) God gives that people a purpose and/or mission. Then danger, conflict, an enemy emerge and threaten the people, the home, and the purpose God has created. In love, God rescues God’s people by repeating the process: forming again, providing again, purposing again. In a very real sense, biblical salvation is New Creation!

Tags:
Links: Bookmark and Share

Feb
25
2014

"Son of God" Movie: Part Brilliant, Part Failure

If you're not aware, the new "Son of God" movie opening in theaters on Friday is directly from the miniseries called "The Bible" which debuted on the History Channel back in March of last year. I watched the entire miniseries and was a vocal critic of many of the producers' choices—especially regarding ethnicity and racial stereotypes.

But their New Testament episodes weren't nearly as terrible as their Old Testament episodes. In fact, there was quite a bit worthy of celebration. So, here I'd like to re-post both the: 1) Brilliant Aspects as well as the; 2) Missed Opportunities

Tags:
Links: Bookmark and Share

Feb
05
2014

Take the Bible More Seriously Than Ken Ham: Interpretation Matters

Since I'm a member of the Christian blogosphere (albeit begrudgingly), this is my nearly obligatory two cents on the Ham v. Nye debate. However, I'm not going to rehearse the debate in any real detail nor attempt to persuade you of my view on the relationship between faith and science. If you care what my view is, suffice to say you can count me among the BioLogos tribe. And I would encourage you to read their take on the debate. You can also read my review of John Walton's book The Lost World of Genesis One to find out more.

In this brief note, I only want to make a simple point: 'Taking the Bible seriously' (as Fundamentalist Christians are prone to call their pseudo-scientific literalism) isn't and doesn't. In other words, the imposing of an anachronistic interpretative grid upon the text of Scripture is incompatible with the claim to take the Bible "seriously." The only way to take the Bible "seriously" is to the take the Bible on the Bible's terms, not our own.

Every person who reads the Bible, interprets the Bible.

Tags:
Links: Bookmark and Share

Jan
23
2014

That Time When Wright Was Wrong: On Christians in the Military

Anyone who knows my theological steeze knows that I dig me some N. T. Wrizzle. I've lost track of how many books I've read by him—both his tomes and his popular-level work. And when he was in town (at Harvard), I got the perfunctory theogeek/fanboy selfie with the Bishop himself:

 

See how happy I look!

So, naturally, on 99% of theological issues, I'm going to see eye-to-eye with Dr. Wright. But, it's important to realize that even the theologians you admire most aren't perfect. Everyone has their blind spots—even the Bishop!

Tags:
Links: Bookmark and Share

Jan
13
2014

Fiercely Moderate Theology: Reflections on Covenant Affirmations by Donald C. Frisk

Author: Donald C. Frisk
Format: Paperback
Publisher: Covenant Publications (2003)
Language: English
Pages: 175
ISBN: N/A

Covenant Bookstore

The Evangelical Covenant Church (hereafter simply the Covenant or ECC) is passionate about unity, fiercely moderate, and insistent on irenic theological dialogue. While carefully articulating a robust, orthodox, and systematic Christian theology, these values shine through most in Donald C. Frisk’s Covenant Affirmations: This We Believe. Throughout the book, Frisk surveys a range of perspectives on each doctrine, drawing from a number of diverse sources and traditions, highlighting the strengths and potential blind spots of each, then invariably manages to carve out a balanced way forward. What results is a theological proposal that is truly catholic and Christian. “Recognizing the possibility of divergent interpretations [of Scripture], the Covenant encourages discussion of the issues within a context of trust and love.” (p.153) I find refreshing this entire approach, and the creative doctrinal formulations it produces. It is positioned to have broad appeal, since it is grounded in sound theological method, respects the Covenant’s Pietist roots, and yet remains open to insights from other branches of the Christian family tree. However, there was at least one section that I found confusing. Uncharacteristic of the book as a whole, Frisk’s delineation of divine revelation, the “word of God,” and The Word of God (Jesus), struck this reader as a bit convoluted at one point. Nevertheless, I could find little to nothing in Covenant Affirmations seriously objectionable. I would only want to suggest a constructive and complementary layer of future theological exploration. These three areas of reflection will frame what follows.

Tags:
Links: Bookmark and Share

Jan
06
2014

Conquer Like the Lamb: Cruciform-centrism in Revelation (For Everyone) by N. T. Wright

For Christmas I was gifted with N. T. Wright's "For Everyone" commentary set on the New Testament thanks to my wife and members of the New City Covenant church plant. (THANK YOU!!!) I've wanted this set of commentaries for my library for several years now, and it's clear now that it was well worth the wait. Just as soon as all the shredded wrapping paper was collected and recycled, I was hard at work digesting the first book from the series I pulled from the shelf. I decided to start with Revelation. For one reason, I recently read Reversed Thunder by Eugene Peterson and loved it. 1 Also, having read a fair amount of Wright's other work, I felt that Revelation might be where his theological insights would shine brightest—and I think I was right.

Wright's commentary on Revelation is excellent! It's accessible, thorough yet brief, and clearly organized. Wright remains true to his signature areas of insight, expounding on the historical-cultural, as well as the socio-religio-political, contexts of the book; the Person of Jesus in relationship to Israel's God (including, obviously, a healthy dose of insight from Second Temple Jewish theology); the nature of the Jesus Movement out of which this text emerges; and the nature of the 'salvation' this book (and the rest of the New Testament) proclaim. Wright's unique perspective on justification makes a few important appearances, and his hallmark critique of Platonic dualism in Western visions of the afterlife also shows up from time to time. Even his now common exposés of violence and systemic injustice make their way into the book. This commentary has all the things which have made N. T. Wright one of my favorite theologians to read.

Above all, Wright's commentary on Revelation is most praiseworthy for its explicit Cruciform-centrism. 2 Five discernible themes in Wright's exposition of Revelation make this clear:

  1. Jesus is the Lamb at the Center of God's Throne;

  2. The Powers War Against the Lamb, the Followers of the Lamb, and God's Good Creation;

  3. The Lamb is Victorious Over the Powers in and Through the Cross;

  4. Jesus's Bride Conquers Like the Lamb—Through Self-giving Love;

  5. God is Faithful to His Covenant Through the Lamb, the Followers of the Lamb, and New Creation

As Wright plainly states upfront: "…the whole point of the book. Jesus himself won the victory through his suffering, and so must his people." - p.10

Tags:
Links: Bookmark and Share

Dec
31
2013

10 Books I Read in 2013 & 10 Books I Want to Read in 2014

In 2013, I actually read more books than I can remember—literally. I went back and tried to create a list (so I can be cool like Larry Garcia!) but it kept getting longer and longer and I realized I wouldn't have this post done before 2014 comes. So, instead, I'm just listing 10 of the best (or most interesting) books I read this past year, and 10 books I'd like to read in 2014.

2013:

1. Mañana - Justo González
I really loved this book and González instantly became one of my new favorite theologians. I'm going to try to read more of his work in the coming years. This book is short and profound!

2. Benefit of the Doubt - Greg Boyd
If you're familiar with Greg Boyd's writing or preaching ministry, little in this book will surprise you. However, this book will be a breath of fresh air for any folks wrestling with Christian faith, or those who have walked away from it. Boyd has a gift for making complex theology accessible.

3. The Real Jesus - Luke Timothy Johnson
This book was assigned reading for a New Testament course, but I really loved it. Not only is LTJ hilariously snarky, he's also a deeply committed scholar. That's a fun combo!

Tags:
Links: Bookmark and Share

Dec
31
2013

10 Transformational Books: A Pilgrimage in Christian Thought

I don’t often participate in Facebook status memes, but I’m a sucker for a walk down book-reading memory lane. So I recently re-posted the 10-books-that-affected-you status. Since these books have had a profound effect on me, here I thought I’d make some brief comments on each one.

Tags:
Links: Bookmark and Share

Oct
23
2013

Election and Grace: The Arrival of King Jesus, Part 5 of 10

We've reached the half-way point in this 10-part series on St. Paul's first letter to the church of the Thessalonians. From here on out, each part will be topical, and we'll be covering themes that appear throughout the letter.

This week we're covering "election and grace". The reason why this subject is important is because some interpretors and commentators have viewed the entire letter through the lens of their doctrine surrounding God's saving election and grace. It is also important because there are at least two key verses which have to do with election and predestination which must be interpreted. So, how should be understand them?

In the attached document, two perspectives from the Reformed tradition are outlined: that of John Calvin and his followers, as well as that of Jacob Arminius and his followers. Then an alternative way of conceptualizing election and grace is outlined.

"Messiah Jesus of Nazareth is the Elect One, the One whom the Father loves. As we “come to him” through repentance and faith, we are added to his spiritual body, the ekklesia, the ‘called out ones,’ and we too become God’s elect. In Jesus, we are being built up into a temple in which God dwells by God’s Spirit."

There are several dialogue questions you can ask yourself or discuss with others. Download the attached document to learn more.

Tags:
Links: Bookmark and Share

Oct
19
2013

The Hope of the Thessalonians: The Arrival of King Jesus, Part 4 of 10

In this 10-week study of First Thessalonians, we've reached week 4. In part 2 and part 3 we looked at the first two components of the letter's "table of contents". Paul (roughly) divides the letter into 3 sections based on the three couplets of praise he gives the Thessalonians: Their "work of faith," their "labor of love," and their "steadfastness of hope." This week, we're looking at the third couplet.

Tags:
Links: Bookmark and Share

Welcome to TheologicalGraffiti.com

T. C. and Tyson Moore

Theological Graffiti is a blog written by T. C. Moore @tc_moore ...a Jesus-disciple, husband, father, urban minister, sometimes designer, writer, preacher, and theology geek. For more about me, visit my Personal Website or my Online Profile. Otherwise, enjoy the graffiti.

Shalom,
T. C.

Books I'm Currently Reading:

Facebook Page

Follow This Blog

 
 

Member: MennoNerds

Browncoats Biblioblog Network

We Aim to Misbehave!

 

TC on Instagram

Recommended Books