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Revelation
Jan
06
2014

Conquer Like the Lamb: Cruciform-centrism in Revelation (For Everyone) by N. T. Wright

For Christmas I was gifted with N. T. Wright's "For Everyone" commentary set on the New Testament thanks to my wife and members of the New City Covenant church plant. (THANK YOU!!!) I've wanted this set of commentaries for my library for several years now, and it's clear now that it was well worth the wait. Just as soon as all the shredded wrapping paper was collected and recycled, I was hard at work digesting the first book from the series I pulled from the shelf. I decided to start with Revelation. For one reason, I recently read Reversed Thunder by Eugene Peterson and loved it. 1 Also, having read a fair amount of Wright's other work, I felt that Revelation might be where his theological insights would shine brightest—and I think I was right.

Wright's commentary on Revelation is excellent! It's accessible, thorough yet brief, and clearly organized. Wright remains true to his signature areas of insight, expounding on the historical-cultural, as well as the socio-religio-political, contexts of the book; the Person of Jesus in relationship to Israel's God (including, obviously, a healthy dose of insight from Second Temple Jewish theology); the nature of the Jesus Movement out of which this text emerges; and the nature of the 'salvation' this book (and the rest of the New Testament) proclaim. Wright's unique perspective on justification makes a few important appearances, and his hallmark critique of Platonic dualism in Western visions of the afterlife also shows up from time to time. Even his now common exposés of violence and systemic injustice make their way into the book. This commentary has all the things which have made N. T. Wright one of my favorite theologians to read.

Above all, Wright's commentary on Revelation is most praiseworthy for its explicit Cruciform-centrism. 2 Five discernible themes in Wright's exposition of Revelation make this clear:

  1. Jesus is the Lamb at the Center of God's Throne;

  2. The Powers War Against the Lamb, the Followers of the Lamb, and God's Good Creation;

  3. The Lamb is Victorious Over the Powers in and Through the Cross;

  4. Jesus's Bride Conquers Like the Lamb—Through Self-giving Love;

  5. God is Faithful to His Covenant Through the Lamb, the Followers of the Lamb, and New Creation

As Wright plainly states upfront: "…the whole point of the book. Jesus himself won the victory through his suffering, and so must his people." - p.10

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Jun
26
2013

The Reality of Revelation (Whether We Like it or Not)

This photo was floating around the interwebs before Joel Watts snatched it up and Brian LePort shared it. It's a play on a familiar slogan from our Fundamentalist friends. In this version, it's been updated to reflect reality.

In case you have trouble reading the parts that are wrinkled, here it is typed out. (And I've added a suggestion Brian made in a Facebook comment):

God said it.

(It was filtered through finite human authors who recorded their inspired thoughts by means of the language, symbols, and customs of their day.)

I interpreted it.

(As best as I could in light of all the filters imposed by my upbrining and culture, which I try to control for but you can never do a perfect job.)

That doesn't exactly settle it.

(But it does give me enough of a platform to base my values and decisions on.)

 

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Feb
27
2013

The Lamb at the Center of Worship: St. John's Revelation and Greg Boyd's Cruciform-centric Hermeneutic

Intro: Christians Who Don't Worship Christ

Until recently, I took it for granted that all Christians understood and agreed on at least one simple fact: That the Bible teaches Messiah Jesus of Nazareth (his life and teachings) is the definitive, perfect, and final revelation of God. After all, the writer of Hebrews makes this much clear: 

"In the past God spoke to our ancestors through the prophets at many times and in various ways, but in these last days he has spoken to us by his Son, whom he appointed heir of all things, and through whom also he made the universe. The Son is the radiance of God’s glory and the exact representation of his being, sustaining all things by his powerful word. After he had provided purification for sins, he sat down at the right hand of the Majesty in heaven."
- Heb. 1.1-3 (NIV, emphasis added)

Or consider Jesus's answer to Phillip's request to see the "Father" (God) to whom Jesus keeps referring,

"Philip said, “Lord, show us the Father and that will be enough for us.”

Jesus answered: “Don’t you know me, Philip, even after I have been among you such a long time? Anyone who has seen me has seen the Father. How can you say, ‘Show us the Father’?
- John 14.8-9 (NIV, emphasis added)

Or, if Jesus's words don't impress you (as has especially become the trend among Calvinists), and you need Paul's didactic teaching style to convince you, consider this gem:

"See to it that no one takes you captive through hollow and deceptive philosophy, which depends on human tradition and the elemental spiritual forces of this world rather than on Christ. For in Christ all the fullness of the Deity lives in bodily form…"
- Col. 2.8-9 (NIV, emphasis added)

What a fool I've been: I presumed there was at least one common area of agreement among those who call themselves "Christians"—that we worship Christ!  But, from recent discussions online and offline, it appears I was wrong. Instead, what I've learned is that some look for a god behind and beyond Jesus. For them, other revelation must be added to Jesus in order for them to receive God's "full" self-revelation. Why they insist on calling themselves "Christians" then, I couldn't tell you. Perhaps a more appropriate label might be "godians."

In particular, the "Christians" with whom I've been discussing are angry about Greg Boyd's proposal of a "cruciform-centric" hermeneutic 1.  Boyd is unabashedly influenced by Anabaptist theology, which has historically advocated for a Christ-centered (christo-centric) reading of Scripture. This is nothing new. Even Calvinists claim to be Christ-centered these days. 2  What Boyd adds to this interpretive methodology is the biblical idea that discipleship is the process of emulating one's Master. (Shocking, I know!) Since Jesus laid down his life, and we are Jesus's disciples, we too are called to lay down our lives—to demonstrate radical, self-sacrificial love (Eph. 5.1-2; Phil. 2.1-11; I Jn. 3.16). This process is now being called "cruciformity"—being formed by the cross, living out cross-shaped love. 3

The objection from some is that this approach is an external grid being imposed on the Scripture, and is therefore eisegesis (importing meaning to the Text), rather than exegesis (drawing meaning from the Text). Objectors also claim that such an approach undermines Scripture's inspiration and authority. By applying the lens of Jesus's cross to passages where God is depicted as violent (for example), these objectors also claim Boyd is attempting to ignore portions of Scripture or cut them out of the Bible entirely. 4

In what follows, I will demonstrate that the Bible itself, namely the book of Revelation, teaches Jesus-disciples to apply the cruciform-centric hermeneutic that Boyd describes. In so doing, I will prove that the cruciform-centric hermeneutic is not some external grid being imposed upon Scripture, but is instead Scripture's own teaching for Christians. Therefore, the cruciform-centric hermeneutic is the appropriate interpretive methodology for Christians (i.e. those who worship Christ).

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Welcome to TheologicalGraffiti.com

T. C. and Tyson Moore

Theological Graffiti is the offical blog of T. C. Moore @tc_moore ...a Jesus-disciple, husband, father, urban church planter @NewCityCovenant, designer @NewCityPro, teacher, student, and friend. Discussion is welcome, so long as it is conducted in a spirit of charity. First and foremost, this blog is for self-expression—then community. More About.Me

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